Fuzail Ahmad

Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Applied Medical Scien

NEUROPHYSIOLOGY

Course Specification

Institution/
University: Majma’ah University

College/Department: College of Applied Medical
Sciences/Department of Physical Therapy & Health Rehabilitation

A Course Identification and General
Information

1. Course
title and cod: Measurement in Physical Therapy RHPT 354

2. Credit hours: 3 hours: 4

3. Program(s) in which
the course is offered.

(If general elective available in many programs indicate this rather
than list programs)

Bachelors of
Physical Therapy

4. Name of faculty member
responsible for the course

Fuzail Ahmad

5. Level/year at which this course is offered: 5th & 6th level/ 3rd year

6. Pre-requisites for this course (if any): Human Physiology

7. Co-requisites for this course (if any): Neuro-Anatomy

B Objectives

1. Summary of the main learning outcomes for students enrolled in the
course.

Main objective for this course is to provide a variety of learning
situations in order to:

  1. give a better understanding of and
    appreciation for neuroscience and
  2. to further your experience in teaching
    yourself how to learn.

2. Briefly describe any plans for developing
and improving the course that are being implemented.

I will try to make the course more
interesting and your learning experience more permanent by seeking your
active participation
in many areas of the course. This semester the
students are suppose to:

* plan the course syllabus by suggesting topics of interest;

* present a topic of interest to the class in the form of an short oral
presentation;

* be involved in all aspects of the course such as writing exam
questions, evaluating peer exams, oral presentations, lab reports and
posters;

* perform several laboratory experiments which will then be presented as
publication quality manuscripts or professional quality posters; and

* Participate in group and class discussions of homework questions and
exam study questions.

C. Course Description:

In this course, we will take an in depth look
at how neurons work together for information transfer to and from the body. We
will also study these topics with respect to the bigger picture: the nervous
system in action. The laboratory section is designed to give an introduction to
neurophysiology research. The student should establish their own personal goals
and objectives for this course and make a constant effort to meet these
objectives.

1. Topics to be
Covered

Topic

No of Weeks

Contact
hours

Overview
of The Nervous System-I

Week 1

1

Overview
of The Nervous System-II

1

Lab Hours

2

Fundamental
Elements of the Nervous System-I

The Neuron

Overview of a
Prototypical Neuron

Classification of
Neurons

Week 2

1

Fundamental
Elements of the Nervous System-II

Electrochemical
Properties of Neuron

Development &
Propagation of an Action Potential

Synaptic
Neurotransmission

1

Lab Hours

2

Neurotransmitters-I

What Is a
Neurotransmitter?

How Do Neurotransmitters
Work?

Types of
Neurotransmitter

Storage and
Release of Neurotransmitters

Neurotransmitter
Receptors

Week 3

1

Neurotransmitters-II
Fast Neurotransmitters

Acetylcholine

Gamma-Aminobutyric
Acid

Glycine
Catecholamines (Norepinephrine,Epinephrine, and Dopamine)

Excitatory Amino
Acids

Neuropeptides
Clinical Correlations

1

Lab Hours

2

Circulation and
Nonneural Cells

Circulatory Systems of the Central Nervous System

Blood Supply of the Nervous System

Cerebrospinal Fluid Circulation

The Blood-Brain Barrier

Neuroglia

Astrocytes

Oligodendrocytes and Schwann Cells

Microglia

Clinical Correlations

Week 4

1

somatic SENSORY SYSTEMS-The Anterolateral
System

Sensory Receptors
for the Anterolateral System
Anterolateral System Pathways
The Spinothalamic Tract
The Spinoreticular Tract
The Trigeminal Pathways
Primary and Secondary Somatosensory Cortex
Clinical Correlations

1

Lab Hours

2

somatic SENSORY SYSTEMS- Dorsal Column Medial Lemniscus System

Peripheral
Receptors, Nerves, and Their Physiology
Mechanoreceptors and Afferent Fibers
Organization of the Dorsal Columns in the Spinal Cord
Precision of Topography in the Spinal Pathway, Dermatomal Distribution
Path to the Somatosensory Cortex
Trigeminal Component
Functions of the Dorsal Column Pathway
Clinical Correlations

Week 5

1

somatic SENSORY SYSTEMS-Proprioception

Cortical
Projections
Sensory Basis of Proprioception
Muscle Receptors
Joint and Cutaneous Receptors
Perception of Limb Position and Movement
Perception of Force
Clinical Correlations

1

Lab Hours

2

First midterm examination (Week 6)

Special Senses- The Auditory System

Structure and
Function of the Ear
Auditory Nerve
Central Pathways
Brainstem Pathways
Inferior Colliculus

Week 7

1

Special Senses- The Vestibular System

Peripheral
Structures
Gross Anatomy
Hair Cells
Functional Principles
Central Pathways
Vestibular Nuclei and Cerebellum
Descending Projections
Ascending Projections
Clinical Correlations

1

Lab Hours

2

Special Senses- The Visual System

Peripheral Visual
System
External Structures
The Lacrimal System
The Visual Pathway
Central Visual Pathways
Visual Cortex
Functional Organization
Control of Eye Movements
The Extraocular Muscles
Neural Control of Eye Movements
Clinical Correlations

Week 8

1

Special Senses-The Chemical Senses I

The Gustatory
System
Taste Receptors
Taste Stimulus Transduction
Coding in Primary Taste Afferent Neurons
Central Pathways for Taste
The Olfactory System
The Olfactory Receptor Mucosa
Olfactory Stimulus Transduction
Higher Olfactory Pathways
Clinical Correlations

1

Lab Hours

2

Somatic Motor System-Lower Centres-I

Organization of
the Neural Substrates Responsible for Movement
Models Of Neural Control: Open-Loop and Closed-Loop Control
Problems of Moving
Peripheral Motor System and Motor Control
Sensory Organs of the Muscle
Clinical Correlations

Week 9

1

Somatic Motor System-Lower Centres-II

Spinal Mechanisms
and Motor Control
Spinal Reflex Mechanisms
Brainstem and Motor Control
Relationship to Spinal Motor Control
Reticular Formation
Cranial Motor Nerves
Red Nucleus
Thalamus
Clinical Correlations

1

Lab Hours

2

Somatic Motor System-Higher Centres I

The Motor Cortex
Structural & Functional Organization of the Motor Cortex
Plasticity of the Motor Cortex
The Basal Ganglia
Structural Organization of the Basal Ganglia
Functions of the Basal Ganglia

Clinical
Correlations

Week 10

1

Somatic Motor System-Higher Centres II

The Cerebellum
Structural Organization of the Cerebellum
Organization of the Cerebellar Projections
Cerebellar Function

Brainstem Motor
Centers
Clinical Correlations

1

Lab Hours

2

second
midterm examination (
Week 11)

Somatic Motor System- The Pyramidal System I

Anteriolateral
Cortico Spinal Tracts
Corticobulbar Tracts

Week12

1

Somatic Motor System- The ExtraPyramidal System II

The Red Nucleus
and the Rubrospinal Tract
The Vestibular Nuclei and the Vestibulospinal Tracts
The Medial Pontomedullary Reticular Formation and the Reticulospinal
Projections

1

Lab Hours

2

The Autonomic Nervous System

Structural &
Functional Organization of Autonomic Nervous System
Autonomic Neurotransmission
Physiology of the Autonomic Nervous System
Autonomic Control of Organs

Week 13

1

The Autonomic Nervous System

Sympathetic
Nervous System

1

Lab Hours

2

The Autonomic Nervous System

Parasympathetic
Nervous System

Week 14

1

The Autonomic Nervous System

Autonomic
Reflexes
The Baroreceptor Reflex
The Micturition Reflex
The Erection Reflex
Vestibular System Interactions With the Autonomic Nervous System
Autonomic Denervation
Clinical Correlations
Horner's Syndrome
Hypertension
Postural Hypotension
Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy
Autonomic Dysreflexia

1

Lab Hours

2

Revision

Week 15

4

2. Course
components (total contact hours per semester):

Lecture:

13 Hours

Tutorial:
NA

Practical/Fieldwork/Internship:

48 Hours

Other: Assignment/Homework

3. Additional
private study/learning hours expected for students per week. (This should be
an average: for the semester not a specific requirement in each week)

4. Development of Learning Outcomes in Domains of
Learning

For each of the domains of learning shown below
indicate:

a. Knowledge

(i) Description
of the knowledge to be acquired

Upon
completion of this course, students should have a basic understanding of the
functions of both the sensory and special senses as input mechanisms for
appraising the central nervous system of the changes occurring both within
and outside of the body. They should be able to relate to how the central
nervous system utilizes this information to maintain homeostasis.

* Identify types of sensory receptors by
the type of sensory stimuli and their differential sensitivity. Identify
nerve fibre types by physiological classification and sensory classification.

* Identify different types of neuronal
pools, including diverging and converging neuronal pools.

* Identify the two major sensory pathways
into the CNS.

* Identify the types of chemical substances
present when tissue is damaged.

* Identify and compare headaches of
intracranial and extra cranial origin.

* Identify types of pain receptors and
understand their transmission pathways into the CNS.

* Identify the cranial nerves and the extra
ocular muscles that control eye movements.

* Identify the auditory pathways to the CNS

* Identify the primary pathways from the
motor cortex to the body.

* Identify various parts of the cerebellum
and the cerebellum’s role in smoothing and coordinating complex sequential
movements.

* Identify clinical abnormalities of the
cerebellum.

(ii) Teaching strategies to be used to develop that knowledge

The format of this course
includes lectures, discussions, laboratories, group problem solving, and
student presentations.

(iii) Methods of assessment of knowledge acquired

  • Class
    test
  • Presentation
  • Assignment
  • Viva
  • Practical
    demonstration

b. Cognitive Skills

(i) Cognitive skills to be developed

They
should be familiar with the function of the motor control systems including
the motor cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia and brain stem, and the role of
each in complex motor activities. Also the role of the autonomic nervous
system in maintaining homeostasis will be studied.

* Understand the function of the medial and
lateral motor systems. Compare fast and slow pain receptors, fibre types, and
pathways.

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الملفات المرفقة

  • Lecture (Neurophysiology-Autonomic Nervous System.pdf - B)
  • Lecture (Neurophysiology-Electrophysiology.pdf - B)
  • Lecture (Neurophysiology-Introduction.pdf - B)

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Contact Numbers: +966 16404 2832

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