Dr. Mona Tawakkul Elsayed

Associate Prof. of Mental Health and Special Education

Partnering for Suc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partnering for Success

 

Getting the most from Ontario’s

New Teacher Induction Program

 

 

 

 

A Resource Handbook for Principals

 

 

 

 

 

 

The use of this material is optional. You are invited to use only the strategies and tools that are specific to your needs and interests, and the needs and interests of the new teacher(s) with whom you are working.

 

 

September 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ontario Ministry of Education

New Teacher Induction Program


 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION                                                                2

 

Welcome!                                                                             2

About this Series                                                                 3

 

GETTING STARTED: program REQUIREMENTS   4

 

Components of the NTIP                                                   4

Outcomes for New Teachers                                              4

Roles and Responsibilities                                                   4

 

IMPLEMENTATION: STEP-BY-STEP                             6

 

1. Identifying Eligible New Teachers                                 6

2. Assigning New Teachers                                                            7

3. Reviewing the Individual NTIP Strategy Form              7

4. New Teacher Orientation (school-based)                      8

5. Professional Development                                              8

6. Mentoring                                                                                    9

7. Teacher Performance Appraisal                                                10

8. Reporting Completion of the NTIP                                10

 

appendices                                                                     11

 

A      NTIP: A Checklist for Principals                               11

B       Orientation Checklist (Sample)                                 12

C      Individual NTIP Strategy Form*                                 14

D      NTIP PD Core Content and Tools                            18

E       Web-Based Resources                                                            49

 

*(this is a required form; please see section 3.2 of the NTIP: Induction Elements Manual)

 

 

 

 

 


INTRODUCTION

 

Welcome!

 

This handbook was developed to support you as a principal in taking full advantage of Ontario’s New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP) as you continue to build a positive school culture, create a dynamic professional learning community and enrich your practice as an instructional leader.

 

 

Important Information!

 

 

 

Any reference to “new teachers” in discussion of the induction elements will also apply to “beginning long-term occasional (LTO) teachers”. For the purposes of the NTIP, a beginning LTO teacher is defined as a certified occasional teacher who is in his or her first long-term assignment of 97 or more consecutive school days as a substitute for the same teacher.

 

The use of this material is optional and you are invited to use only the strategies and tools that are specific to your needs and interests, and the needs and interests of the new teachers with whom you are working.

 

The NTIP has been designed to support the growth and professional development of new teachers so that they can develop the skills and knowledge that will enable them to achieve success as experienced teachers in Ontario. By helping new teachers achieve their full potential, the NTIP supports Ontario’s vision of achieving high levels of student performance.  In accordance with the Education Act, all school boards must offer the NTIP to new teachers and all new teachers must participate.

 

It is important to keep in mind, as a new teacher begins his or her career that proficiency comes with practice. We don’t learn to teach. Rather, we learn from our teaching. Teachers will continue to refine their expertise through professional relationships and conversations with colleagues, which expand their knowledge, and through applying and adapting information and strategies within the context of their own classrooms.

 

This resource material is intended help you support new teachers as they begin their first year of teaching. The use of the material is optional, and you, your mentors and your new teachers are encouraged to use only the strategies and tools that are specific to your needs. The self-reflection questions are intended to challenge, to foster professional dialogue and to provide ideas to stimulate conversation. These resources have not been designed to test new teachers’ knowledge and skills, but rather to provide them with information as they grow and develop within the profession.

 

The conversation starters in this handbook have been developed to support you, as principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school.

 

Within this handbook, you will find a brief introduction to the NTIP and the mentoring process, along with a collection of useful resources and supports for principals, mentors and new teachers. You will also find a reference copy of the NTIP Individual Strategy form you and your new teachers will need to use during the NTIP as well as a detailed summary of procedures.


About this Series

 

This publication is one of three handbooks developed to support participants in the New Teacher Induction Program. The three handbooks are:

 

·   Partnering for Success: A Resource Handbook for Mentors

·   Partnering for Success: A Resource Handbook for New Teachers

·   Partnering for Success: A Resource Handbook for Principals

 

While the information contained in the handbooks for mentors and new teachers is unique, it is also aligned with the content of this handbook to ensure that all participants in the process have the information they need to participate effectively and successfully.

 

 

 

Where to Find NTIP Manuals

 

 

Electronic versions of the New Teacher Induction Program: Induction Elements Manual, 2010 and the Teacher Performance Appraisal: Technical Requirements Manual, 2010 are available in the Teaching Excellence section of the Ministry’s website at:

http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teacher/induction.html

 

Please refer to the website for further information about the NTIP and answers to Frequently Asked Questions.

 

 

 

 


GETTING STARTED: PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

 

The New Teacher Induction Program is a province-wide initiative designed to support new teachers by providing orientation, mentoring and professional development during the early stages of a new teacher’s career. The following summarizes the elements and purpose of the NTIP, and will familiarize you with the roles and responsibilities of each participant in the process.

 

Components of the NTIP

 

The NTIP is comprised of the following induction elements:

 

·   orientation for all new teachers to the school and school board;

·   professional development and training for new teachers; and

·   mentoring of new teachers by experienced teachers.

 

In addition, all new teachers are required to have two performance appraisals conducted by principals in the first twelve months after they begin teaching. New teachers will complete the NTIP when they receive two Satisfactory ratings in their performance appraisals. For teachers who do not obtain two Satisfactory appraisal ratings within the first year, the NTIP program continues into a second year, to provide additional supports to the teacher.

 

Outcomes for New Teachers

 

By successfully completing the NTIP, new teachers will have:

 

·   become oriented to their schools and boards, and the Ontario curriculum;

·   improved their skills and confidence through a positive mentoring relationship;

·   received appropriate professional development;

·   demonstrated their competencies as described in the TPA process; and

·   proven themselves successful teaching in an Ontario publicly funded school board.

 

Roles and Responsibilities

 

The NTIP is a school based program in which developing strong professional relationships between principals and new teachers, and between new teachers and mentors, is instrumental to professional growth.

 

The role of the principal as instructional leader in a school is pivotal to the integration of a new teacher. By developing strong professional relationships with new teachers, and supporting the professional relationships between new teachers and their mentors, principals exercise their critical role as catalysts for professional development who contribute to the shaping of teachers’ work and skills.

 

The following chart outlines the roles and responsibilities of each of the key partners in the implementation of the NTIP at the school level.

 

 

Roles & Responsibilities

New Teacher

Mentor(s)

Principal

Individual NTIP Strategy

X

X

X  Ö

School-level Orientation

 

X

X  Ö

Individual PD/training

X

X

X  Ö

Selection of Mentors

X

X

X  Ö

Mentoring Relationship

X

X

X

Teacher Performance Appraisals

X

 

X √

X = consultation and development  

Ö = final approval

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


IMPLEMENTATION: STEP-BY-STEP

 

The model developed and adopted for the NTIP was designed by educators from across the province. In particular, it reflects the effective practices and lessons learned from mentoring demonstration projects completed in more than 20 school boards during 2004-2005.

 

While each teacher, school and community has unique needs, the following recommended practices will provide you with sound guidelines for successfully implementing each aspect of the NTIP in your school.

 

 

1 Identifying Eligible New Teachers

 

The information below is intended to help you identify the categories of new teachers who will be participating in the NTIP for this school year and the induction supports they must receive under the program.

 

Teachers new to the profession (trained within Ontario, Canada, or Internationally)

 

New teachers are defined as all teachers certified by the Ontario College of Teachers (OCT) (including teachers trained out-of-province) who have been hired into permanent positions—full-time or part-time – by a school board, school authority or provincial school to begin teaching for the first time in Ontario. These new teachers must receive:

 

·   orientation;

·   mentoring; and

·   professional development.

 

Teachers with experience

 

Experienced teachers, certified by the OCT, trained inside or outside of Ontario and teaching in an Ontario publicly funded board for the first time must receive:

 

·   orientation

 

Experienced teachers certified outside of Ontario should, in addition, receive supports that:

 

·   complement their specific needs and teaching experience; and

·   emphasize Ontario curriculum and policy.

 

Other first-year teachers

All boards must offer all three induction elements of the NTIP (orientation, mentoring and professional development) to their beginning LTO teachers. Their participation should be recorded on the Individual NTIP Strategy form. If those teachers subsequently start a permanent contract position, boards may take their previous participation into account when determining which induction elements are appropriate.

Beginning LTO teachers are not required to receive two performance appraisals. Because occasional teachers are not included in the definition of “new teacher”, they are not eligible to receive the NTIP notation until such time that they do come within that definition.  Teacher Performance Appraisal (TPA) results prior to becoming a “new teacher” do not count for the purposes of the NTIP notation.

 

2 Assigning New Teachers

 

Research indicates that the first teaching assignment of a new teacher is critical. The Working Table on Teacher Development, which advised the ministry on the development of the NTIP, recommended that the teaching assignments for new teachers should specifically:

 

·   set new teachers up for success in improving student learning;

·   be linked to teachers’ qualifications and strengths;

·   be guided by a culture that supports new teachers;

·   ensure that new teachers have support in the school, and are not isolated; and

·   ensure that new teachers have the resources they need and, in particular, support with student assessment.

 

 

3 Reviewing the Individual NTIP Strategy Form

 

 

In This Handbook:

The Individual NTIP Strategy

 

See the appendices for a

copy of the NTIP

Individual Strategy

form, and detailed

summary of

procedures,

for your reference. 

                   

The Individual NTIP Strategy form:

 

·   serves as a vehicle for discussion and learning;

·   serves as a means of planning, tracking, and recording participation in the NTIP Induction elements;

·   contains no evaluative elements;

·   is intended to reflect when a new teacher has completed participation in his or her individualized program; and

·   is not a checklist.

 

The Individual NTIP Strategy form will be approved by the principal so that he or she can arrange the supports and allocate the appropriate resources. In the event that a new teacher changes schools or boards prior to completing the NTIP, the Individual NTIP Strategy form will serve to indicate the elements of the program that have already been completed. (Principal initials on the form are only needed in the above case.)

The program requires that the Individual NTIP Strategy form be used. Please refer to the NTIP website at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teacher/induction.html for the current form. A copy of the form and detailed procedures are also provided in the appendices of this handbook.

 

4 New Teacher Orientation (school-based)

 

Quality orientation programs familiarize new teachers with the classroom, the school, the school board and education in Ontario.

 

In addition to the orientation your new teachers receive from your board, an orientation to your school and community must be provided. An effective orientation should:

 

·   be initiated by the principal, supported by superintendent/senior staff;

·   reflect a collaborative school culture;

·   provide a supportive and timely transition to effective classroom organization, planning and program delivery;

·   provide an introduction to the NTIP and an overview of the appraisal process for new teachers;

·   include an introduction to the mentor contact;

·   be accompanied by a checklist to ensure that key school-related information is covered (see Appendices A and B for sample checklists); and

·   include other activities/sessions as determined by the school.

 

 

5 Professional Development

 

Effective professional learning is based on a foundation of high standards through a coherent system that ensures appropriate and effective learning opportunities for teachers at all levels of experience. All professional development opportunities for new teachers should be differentiated, ongoing and appropriate.

 

Appendix D of this handbook includes a summary of professional development core content and a set of conversations starters for principals, on the following topics:

 

Keep in Mind…

 

Appendix D is not intended as a checklist.  Rather, it is a tool for both new teachers and principals to use in their individual reflections on, and conversations about, supporting student learning in the classroom.

 

·      Classroom Management

·      Planning, Assessment and Evaluation

·      Communication with Parents/Guardians

·      Equity and Inclusive Education

·      Literacy, K-6

·      Literacy, 7-12

·      Mathematical Literacy/Numeracy, 7-12

·      Numeracy, K-6

·      Safe Schools and Healthy Schools

·      Student Success/Learning to 18

·      Teaching French as a Second Language

·      Teaching Students with Special Education Needs

·      Teaching Diverse Learners including First Nation, Métis and Inuit Students and

English Language Learners

 

6 Mentoring

 

Mentoring is Not Evaluative!

 

 

While the New Teacher Induction Program includes teacher performance appraisal by the principal, the mentoring process is a non-evaluative process, and is distinct and separate from the teacher performance appraisal.

 

The relationship between mentor and new teacher is one of trust and confidence. It is important to establish this trust early in the relationship, so that the new teacher is able to engage in open and honest dialogue about his or her successes and challenges in the classroom, without concerns that this may in any way be connected to performance appraisal.

 

 

Based on processes developed by the NTIP Steering Committee, principals should ensure that mentors are:

 

·   recruited, selected and matched appropriately;

·   provided with access to the training as developed by the board;

·   provided with a clear and safe exit procedure (for mentors as well as new teachers) in case of non-compatibility;

·   given the assurance that confidentiality between mentors and new teachers is respected; and

·   provided access to mentoring activities that are integrated with ongoing personal and professional development.

 

Teachers new to the profession are eager to contribute to their learning communities in meaningful ways. Welcoming new teachers into the professional learning community in your school will be of great benefit to all teachers and students. Experienced teachers can help guide their colleagues in many ways to contribute to the school community while helping with time management and alerting them to school priorities.

 

Mentoring provides a wide range of benefits, not only to new teachers, but also to the more experienced teachers who mentor them. In fact, many teachers who serve as mentors have found the experience to have been as personally and professionally rewarding as new teachers do.  Many mentors also report a renewed sense of connection to the school community and reduced isolation. Certainly, most mentors derive great satisfaction from having the opportunity to become a role model, facilitator and coach to a new teacher.

 

Mentors also serve as models of professional language when talking with new teachers. One of the most important messages we can convey to new teachers is that they bring energy, renewal and a sustained professional commitment to students.


7 Teacher Performance Appraisal

 

In conjunction with the orientation, mentoring and professional development and training elements of the NTIP, the performance appraisal process for new teachers has been designed to support and promote their continued growth and development.

 

As a principal, you play a critical role in supporting new teachers’ professional growth through the appraisal process, and through the opportunity to engage in dialogue with new teachers to deepen their understanding of what it means to be a teacher, as described in the Ontario College of Teachers’ Standards of Practice for the Teaching Profession.

 

The appraisal process for new teachers is designed to strengthen schools as learning communities in which new teachers are provided with plentiful opportunities to engage in professional exchange and collective inquiry that lead to continuous growth and development.

 

New teachers will complete the NTIP when they receive two Satisfactory ratings in performance appraisals, usually in the first 12 months after they begin teaching. For teachers who do not obtain two Satisfactory appraisal ratings within the first year, the NTIP program continues into the second year to provide additional supports to the teacher.

 

For further information, please refer to the Teacher Performance Appraisal: Technical Requirements Manual, 2010, which is available through your board, or electronically at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teacher/induction.html. This essential resource describes all of the requirements of the performance appraisal process.

 

 

8 Reporting Completion of NTIP

 

Principals must sign the NTIP Individual Strategy form for all new teachers who receive two Satisfactory performance ratings, and forward a copy to the designated NTIP superintendent as soon as possible. Please note that the designated NTIP superintendent must submit the names of all new teachers who complete the NTIP to the Ontario College of Teachers within 60 calendar days of a new teacher’s second satisfactory performance rating. Principals should forward the completed teacher performance appraisal forms to their board in keeping with existing procedures, as described in the Teacher Performance Appraisal: Technical Requirements Manual, 2010.

 


Appendix A

 

NTIP: A Checklist for Principals

 

ð        Meet with new teachers when they are hired or assigned to the school to discuss the Individual NTIP Strategy form (available at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teacher/induction.html ) and to communicate to the new teacher those induction elements in which he or she is required to participate, based on the definition of “new teacher” and requirements related to participation in the NTIP.

ð        Ensure that each new teacher, in consultation with his or her mentor, fills out the Individual NTIP Strategy form, and ensure that the strategy is revised throughout the year as needs change.

ð        Ensure implementation of school-based supports (orientation, mentoring and professional development and training) for new teachers as appropriate.

ð        Ensure that mentors are recruited, selected and matched according to the board process developed by the NTIP Steering Committee.

ð        Ensure that mentors receive training (this may be carried out through board level activities where appropriate).

ð        Work with the designated NTIP superintendent and other principals regarding system-wide sessions where these are more appropriate.

ð        Allocate funding to support each new teacher according to his or her Individual NTIP Strategy.

ð        Conduct performance appraisals for each new teacher in accordance with the requirements of the performance appraisal process for new teachers set out in the Education Act and accompanying Regulations and Guidelines, and in conjunction with any additional requirements established by your board. Principals should refer to the

      Teacher Performance Appraisal: Technical Requirements Manual, 2010.

ð        Sign each new teacher’s Individual NTIP Strategy form and forward a copy to the designated NTIP superintendent when the teacher has received two Satisfactory performance ratings. This will indicate to the board that the new teacher is eligible for the notation of successful completion on his or her Certificate of Qualification.

ð        Ensure that ministry/board funding provided for new teachers is used to support NTIP activities.


Appendix B

 

Orientation Checklist (Sample)

 

Based on a survey of new teachers and their mentors, the following orientation tool has been developed to assist a principal or a school team when introducing and welcoming new members to the school staff.

 

Operational

ð        Staff manual / school improvement plan

ð        School tour / staff introductions

ð        Playground and/or cafeteria tour - duty areas

ð        School safety plan

ð        First aid (such as supplies, epi-pens, student concerns)

ð        Tragic events response team information

ð        Computer lab / school / board (such as netiquette)

ð        Library protocol / audio-visual resources

ð        School resource personnel / educational assistants

ð        Federation representative / work place steward

ð        Photocopiers / protocol (such as paper allocation)

ð        Supply cupboard / storage / textbook distribution

ð        Key(s) and security / after-school access

ð        O.S.R. storage / protocols

ð        Student information / emergency contacts

ð        School calendar

ð        Booking media, av equipment

ð        Booking rooms / gym, stage, labs and other facilities

 

Curriculum / Program

ð        Mentoring support

ð        Curriculum guidelines

ð        Division or department planning / collaboration

ð        New teacher induction program / PD opportunities / registration procedures

ð        Timetables / schedules / class lists

ð        Classroom management / behaviour intervention

ð        Profiles of high-needs students

ð        Field trip procedures

ð        Report cards / related software

ð        Homework policy

ð        Ordering of classroom supplies

ð        Media resources / ordering of curriculum resources

ð        Teaching / learning resources (such as TIPS, EQAO, early literacy initiatives)

ð        Special Education policies and procedures / intensive support

 


Communication

ð        Attendance / absence procedures

ð        O.S.R.s - release of information / custody forms

ð        Student referrals to outside agencies

ð        Early identification

ð        Team meetings / IEP  reviews

ð        Absences / occasional teacher protocol

ð        Phone / fax instructions / p.a.

ð        Mailboxes / phone messages

ð        Medication procedures / medical plans

ð        Accident forms

ð        Fire drills / emergency procedures

ð        Media issues

ð        Locks / lockers

ð        Code of conduct / dress code / school handbook

ð        Staff / division / department meetings

ð        Classroom budget / money collection / deposit forms

ð        Daily school routines (such as announcements, entry, and similar)

ð        Communication with administration

ð        Assembly schedules

 

Other

ð        Community access to building

ð        Contacting parents / letters home

ð        Meetings / interviews with parents

ð        Newsletters

ð        Employee assistance program

ð        Board, OCT and federation services

ð        Bulletin boards / displays

ð        Open house / program night (expectations / roles)

ð        School council / PTA / parent associations

ð        Staff room protocol

ð        Study hall, detention room, homework club

ð        Supervision expectations, lunchroom, hallways

ð        Volunteer policy

ð        Social committee

ð        Bus routines

ð        Community activities (such as multicultural evenings and other events)

ð        Teacher performance appraisal

 

 

(Adapted with permission from Mentoring Demonstration Project boards)

 

 

 

 


Appendix C

 

The Individual NTIP Strategy Form

 

The Individual NTIP Strategy form is intended to serve as a vehicle for discussion and learning, as well as a means of planning, tracking, and recording the NTIP induction elements in which each new teacher participates. It contains no evaluative elements and is intended as a tool to reflect completion of the NTIP individualized program. This form is not a checklist.

 

The program requires that the Individual NTIP Strategy form be used. Please refer to the on-line appendices at

http://faab.edu.gov.on.ca/NTIP.htm for the current year’s form.

 

The New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP) requires that the Individual NTIP Strategy form be used. The following chart summarizes the process.

 

Principal

New Teacher

Beginning LTO Teacher*

Mentor

¡  as part of school level orientation, the principal will provide information on the elements of NTIP: orientation, professional development and training, mentoring, and the TPA for new teachers

¡  the principal gives the Individual NTIP Strategy form to the new teacher and indicates that this is the form to be used to record and track supports needed in each of the NTIP elements (excluding TPA)

¡  the principal, based on the definition of new teacher in the NTIP: Induction Elements Manual (2008), communicates to the new teacher the elements in which he/she needs to participate

¡  the principal lets the new  teacher know that the mentor can collaborate with him/her on the completion of the form and that once they have discussed needs and planned strategies, the new teacher will then share the plan with the principal so that the he/she can approve and allocate the appropriate resources

               

¡  the principal does not evaluate the NTIP Individual Strategy Form or Induction elements

¡  the principal, as catalyst in the new teacher’s professional growth, through collaborative leadership, has an ongoing role in monitoring progress and reallocating resources as needed throughout the year

¡  the principal records on the Summative Report Form for New Teachers  the NTIP induction elements in which the new teacher has participated/is participating (as previously communicated to the teacher by the principal based on the definition of “new teacher” in the NTIP: Induction Elements Manual, 2010).

 

¡  once the new teacher has received two Satisfactory ratings on performance appraisals for new teachers, the principal signs the form to indicate that the NTIP has been completed

¡  as part of school level orientation, the new teacher receives information on the NTIP: orientation, professional development and training, mentoring, and the TPA for new teachers

 

 

¡  the new teacher receives the NTIP form from the principal along with an explanation of its use

¡  the new teacher is responsible for the Individual NTIP Strategy form

 

 

¡  once the new teacher understands which category he/she is in and in which elements he/she must participate, the new teacher collaborates with the mentor and principal (or others as needed) to determine what participation in those elements will look like including topics, strategies, timelines etc (excludes TPA). Once ready the new teacher shares  the plan with the principal so that the principal can approve and allocate the appropriate resources

 



 

¡  the new teacher continues to collaborate with the mentor to work through the plan, making adjustments if necessary

 

¡  the new teacher is in conversation on an on-going basis with the principal and mentor as they progress through the plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

¡  the new teacher signs the form once participation in the NTIP induction elements has been completed.

 

¡  as part of school level orientation, the beginning LTO teacher receives information on the NTIP: orientation, professional development and training, mentoring, and evaluation processes (if applicable)

 

¡  the beginning LTO teacher receives the NTIP form from the principal along with an explanation of its use

¡  the beginning LTO teacher is responsible for the Individual NTIP Strategy form

 

¡  once the beginning LTO teacher understands which category he/she is in and in which elements he/she must participate, the beginning LTO teacher collaborates with the mentor and principal (or others as needed) to determine what participation in those elements will look like including topics, strategies, timelines etc (excludes TPA). Once ready the beginning LTO teacher shares  the plan with the principal so that the principal can approve and allocate the

 

       appropriate resources

 

 

¡  the beginning LTO teacher continues to collaborate with the mentor to work through the plan, making adjustments if necessary

 

¡  the beginning LTO teacher is in conversation on an on-going basis with the principal and mentor as they progress through the plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Beginning full-time continuing education teachers who are participating in the induction elements of NTIP should also use the INS Form.

¡  as part of mentor training, the mentor receives information on the NTIP: orientation, professional development and training, and mentoring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

¡  the mentor works in consultation and collaboration with the new teacher or the beginning LTO teacher to determine what participation in the elements will look like including topics, strategies, timelines, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

¡  the mentor meets with the new teacher or the beginning LTO teacher to work through the plan, suggesting adjustments if necessary

 

¡  the mentor continues to collaborate with the new teacher  or the beginning LTO teacher to work through the plan, suggesting adjustments if necessary

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Individual NTIP Strategy FORM

مربع نص: Name:           

 

New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP) Elements

Professional Learning Goals

Strategies for meeting my goals

Principal Initials*

*The principal only needs to initial the elements in which the new teacher /beginning LTO teacher has participated in the event that the new teacher transfers schools/boards before completing the NTIP

Orientation                                                                                       .

Board level (See section 4.3 in NTIP Induction Elements Manual)

 

 

 

School level (See section 4.3 in NTIP Induction Elements Manual)

 

 

 

Professional Development and Training - These opportunities must be differentiated to meet the needs of the teachers’ specific assignments

(e.g., rotary, itinerant, self-contained, elementary, secondary…etc.)

Opportunities might address: Classroom Management; Planning, Assessment and Evaluation; Communication with Parents; Teaching Students with Special Needs and other Diverse Learners; Education Priorities (e.g., Literacy and Numeracy strategies, Student Success, Safe Schools, PAL, FSL, Early Learning, Equity and Inclusive Education)

 

Area of PD and Training

e.g., Classroom Management

 

Professional Learning Goals

 

e.g., Developing effective classroom routines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategies for meeting my goals

 

e.g., Attend workshop; meet with mentor; dialogue with colleagues.

 

Mentoring – Development of NTIP Individual Strategy with Mentor; Mentoring activities (e.g., planning, dialogue, professional development, other)

 

Mentoring Activity

 

e.g., Planning

 

 

Professional Learning Goals

 

e.g., Develop effective strategies to maximize uninterrupted learning time and student time on task.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Strategies for meeting my goals

 

e.g., Observe mentor; engage in pre and post observation dialogue with mentor.

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES ARE REQUIRED UPON COMPLETION OF THE NTIP.

 

 

I have participated in the NTIP elements described above.

 

Teacher* Signature:_________________________                      Date:_____________________   *The new teacher should keep a copy of the completed form.

 

This new teacher has completed two satisfactory teacher performance appraisals and his/her name will be forwarded to the Ontario College of Teachers for NTIP notation.

 

Principal Signature:________________________                       Date:_____________________

 

 

 

 

 

 


Appendix D

 

NTIP Professional Development Core Content and Tools

 

 

The use of this material is optional and you are invited to use only the strategies and tools that are specific to your needs and interests and the needs and interests of the new teacher with whom you are working.

 

Ontario is committed to giving every student the opportunity to reach his or her full potential by promoting excellence in teaching and learning and thus making public education in Ontario the best education available.

 

Increasing student performance means providing the support and recognition for what teachers, including beginning teachers, do on behalf of students every day.  The New Teacher Induction Program (NTIP) provides new teachers with an additional year of professional support, and school boards and principals with the vehicle to manage how, when and what their new teachers learn in that crucial first year.

 

In order to be most meaningful and effective, professional development and training for new teachers, as well as resources developed to support such professional development and training, must contain the appropriate content to meet the specific needs of new teachers while taking into consideration the varied strengths, the previous experiences and the unique skill set that each new teacher brings to the profession at the beginning stages of their career.

In this Appendix

 

Areas Identified by New Teachers

Classroom Management

Planning, Assessment and Evaluation

Communication with Parents/Guardians

 

Ministry Initiatives

Equity and Inclusive Education

Literacy, K-6

Literacy, 7-12

Mathematical Literacy/Numeracy, 7-12

Numeracy, K-6                                    

Safe Schools and Healthy Schools   

Student Success/Learning to 18        

Teaching English Language Learners

Teaching First Nation, Métis and Inuit Students

Teaching French as a Second Language

Teaching Students with Special Education Needs

 

The following tools have been developed with various target audiences in mind in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional development through their first year in the profession.

 

 It is not a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance. It is intended as a guide to foster discussion and professional development and training planning within the new teacher/mentor/principal team in order to meet each individual new teacher’s professional development and training needs. New teachers, principals and boards will find that resources to support the development and delivery of the professional development and training can come from various sources. Boards have traditionally developed excellent resources that meet the local needs of their schools, their teachers and their students.


 

 

Professional Learning

 

 

Professional learning plays an important role in student success. It has the greatest effect when it is clearly focused, practical, guided by current research and shared among educators in a supportive, risk-free learning community.

 

It is not a one-time event or the exclusive responsibility of a few teachers: it is a career-long process, based on a model of lifelong learning ingrained in the culture of the school, the board and the Ministry of Education, and embedded in planning at all levels.

 

Beginning teachers have identified classroom management, planning, assessment and evaluation, and communication with parents as the areas they felt needed most to be addressed by the professional development component of the NTIP. 

 

Professional learning, however, is most effective when it relates purposefully to school and board goals and to the Ontario curriculum. Schools and boards must therefore plan and implement job-embedded professional development for new teachers, linking it directly to their own and to the ministry’s priorities, i.e., higher levels of achievement for all and higher graduation rates through improved literacy and numeracy skills. (Adapted from Literacy for Learning: The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy in Grades 4 to 6 in Ontario.)

 

The various professional development “subject areas” should not be viewed as independent.  For example, Classroom Management is contingent upon effective program delivery as well as consistent routines and an organized, inclusive classroom environment. In an effort to encourage a holistic approach to the delivery of professional development, an effort was made to weave strands such as success for all students, respect for diversity in all its forms and a focus on literacy within the different resources and tools presented in this document.

 

Furthermore, the ministry will continue to develop and/or recommend additional resources to support new teachers in these areas. Please refer to the NTIP website at http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teacher/induction.html for more information.

 

Many of the ministry’s initiatives work together to support school boards in promoting and achieving excellence; as such, various branches within the ministry were asked to contribute to this NTIP PD core content by supplying and reviewing material related to their respective initiatives.

 

Most school boards already offer professional development and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. This description of the core content will help to ensure a level of consistency in professional development and training opportunities for new teachers across the province by presenting a means by which school boards can review what they are already offering in order to make sure it aligns with the provincial requirements.

 

Teaching is a complex activity that integrates effective instructional practices, classroom management, planning, assessment and evaluation, and communication strategies along with a strong understanding of how to meet the diverse learning needs found in every classroom.  Classroom practice that supports high achievement for all students must involve strategies that are responsive to the learning needs of students with respect to race, culture, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, sexual orientation, family status or ability.  When planning professional development and training to address any of the following areas, it is important to consider how each area is integrated with the others and, therefore, how professional development and training might best be delivered to reflect this complex integration.

 

In addition, in the French-language school system, it is the responsibility of French-language school boards to provide ongoing professional development and training on the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to teach in a minority setting. New teachers in French language schools must be supported to fully understand the impact of the implementation of Politique d’aménagement linguistique on the school, the classroom, the students and the school community as a whole.


Classroom Management:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Classroom Management” should include the following core content:

 

·   Developing respectful relationships among students and between students and adults

·   Strategies for building and supporting a safe, inclusive, learning-focused classroom environment where diversity is seen as a strength

·   Effective strategies for establishing clear classroom procedures, routines and norms of collaboration

·   Effective strategies for organizing time (such as timetabling, transitions) to maximize uninterrupted learning time and student time on task

·   Strategies for collaborating with students on setting and maintaining classroom norms and rules

·   Effective strategies for dealing with challenging behaviours

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 


Classroom Management:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& In what way is your classroom environment safe, inclusive and learning-focused?

& Tell me about the aspects of your classroom learning environment that reflect and promote diversity as a strength . . .

& Tell me about the evidence of respectful peer relationships you are seeing in your classroom . . .

& What do you feel have been your most effective classroom management strategies?  What do you feel has made them so effective?

& What are you noticing about how students are responding to your classroom management strategies?

& Are there specific strategies that you are using when confronted with challenging behaviours?  How are your students responding to these strategies?

& Tell me about the specific strategies that you are using to maximize uninterrupted learning time and student time on task . . .

& How do you involve students in setting the norms, rules and routines?

& How does the physical layout of the classroom support the development of independence? How does it support effective cooperative learning?

& What do the physical layout and the walls of your classroom tell me about your classroom learning community?

& What norms of collaboration have you established in your classroom?

& What kind of support or new learning do you feel you need next in order to work even more effectively with the students in your classroom?

& What strategies/resources will you use as you work on expanding your classroom management repertoire?

& To whom do you turn when you have a question about classroom management?

& How can I help you be even more effective?

& ?

 

 

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 


Planning, Assessment & Evaluation:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Planning, Assessment & Evaluation” should include the following core content:

 

·   Curriculum-focused long- and short-term planning, keeping the end in mind: what students need to know and will be able to do

·   Selecting and using ongoing classroom assessment strategies and data to inform instruction and plan appropriate interventions to improve student achievement

·   Using assessment and evaluation strategies that are appropriate to the curriculum and the learning activities, are fair to all students and accommodate the needs and experiences of all students, including English language learners and students with special education needs

·   Providing students with numerous and varied opportunities to demonstrate the full extent of their achievement without overwhelming them

·   Collecting multiple samples of student work that provide evidence of their achievement

·   Referring to exemplars to assess and evaluate student work

·   Using provincial achievement charts to assess and evaluate student work

·   Selecting and using effective strategies to support students’ self-monitoring, self-assessment and goal-setting for their own learning

·   Informing and helping students and parents to understand the assessment and evaluation strategies to be used and giving them meaningful feedback for improvement

·   Applying provincial report card policies and board guidelines for reporting on student achievement

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planning, Assessment & Evaluation:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& During classroom planning, how are you considering long- and short-term goals and keeping the end in mind?

& How have you made your students aware of your plans for their learning? How have they responded?

& What process do you use for setting learning goals with students?

& What can you tell me about the instructional strategies you are implementing to meet the needs of all your students?

& What have you noticed about student responses to your assessment strategies? How might those responses effect your practices from this point?

& What kinds of assessment tools are you using?  Are any of these assessments common to the grade/division/course? What are you learning about your students through the use of these tools?

& What methods of providing feedback to students have had the most impact on student learning thus far?

& How do you gather and record student assessment data?

& What kind of student assessment data are you using to plan instruction and select learning resources?

& How does assessment data help you make instructional decisions for all of your students, especially struggling students?

& What support do you need to analyze the student achievement data you gather?

& In what ways are you using the provincial achievement charts?

& What steps have you taken to ensure you have a good understanding of how to complete the provincial report card so that students and parents are well informed about student achievement?

& What kind of support or new learning do you feel you need next in order to work even more effectively with the students in your classroom?

& What strategies/resources will you use as you work on expanding your assessment repertoire?

& To whom do you turn when you have a question about planning, assessment or evaluation?

& How can I help you be even more effective?

& ?

 

 

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communication with Parents/Guardians:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Communication with Parents/Guardians” should include the following core content:

 

·   Understanding the perspective of parents/guardians and families  

·   Developing open and collaborative communication skills

·   Developing attitudes, skills and communication strategies to foster a collaborative relationship with parents and students

·   Strategies to engage parents and families in supporting their child’s learning at home and at school

·   Strategies to communicate with parents on an ongoing basis about:

o   classroom events, assignments and expectations (such as planners, newsletters, class website, etc.)

o   assessment and evaluation: informing and helping students and parents understand strategies to be used, for formative evaluation, and to give them meaningful feedback for improvement

o   students’ progress (such as report card comments, parent-teacher conferences, etc.)

o   school events and volunteer opportunities

·   Positive conflict resolution strategies and strategies aimed specifically at dealing with challenging situations

·   Developing teaching strategies that foster an open and collaborative relationship with parents and families

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communication with Parents/Guardians:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& Talk to me about the parents and families of the students in your classroom…

& Tell me about your first contact of the new school year with the parents of your students...

& Talk to me about how you involve parents in your classroom’s learning community…

& How do you decide when to call, write or meet a parent?

& How do you reach parents who find involvement more challenging due to language, recent immigration, poverty or newness to the system?

& What strategies do you use to communicate and meet with parents? How do you help parents get involved with homework and/or with volunteering in the classroom?  How do you support each parent with supporting their child’s learning at home and at school?

& What have you learned to further promote positive working relationships with parents and families?

& What further knowledge/support do you need in the areas of:

  • effective ongoing communication with parents?
  • what to share with or communicate to parents?
  • how to deal with parent communication issues?

& How and what do you record about your communications with parents?

& What strategies/resources will you use as you work on expanding your repertoire of communication strategies with parents?

& To whom do you turn when you have a question about communicating with parents?

& How can I further help you to be even more effective in this area?

& ?

 

In French-language schools, the principal might also ask:

 

& Have you talked to parents about Politique d’aménagement linguistique and the ways they might help you implement it?

& Have you involved parents in animation culturelle activities?

& How do you communicate with parents who do not speak French?

& ?

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity and Inclusive Education:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Equity and Inclusive Education” should include the following core content:

 

·   Knowledge of and ability to articulate the main concepts of Ontario’s Equity and Inclusive Education (EIE) Strategy.

·   Awareness of specific classroom practices that support the new teacher in the school’s implementation of the EIE Strategy.

·   Knowledge of the 8 Areas of Focus and how they affect the new teacher’s work in the classroom.

·   An understanding of how the board’s Religious Accommodation Guideline affects the new teacher’s classroom practices.

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity and Inclusive Education:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& How do you foster a commitment to equity of outcomes and to closing the achievement gaps among your students?

& What classroom practices have you put in place to have all students feel respected and welcomed?

& Tell me about how you model the values and vision of the Equity and Inclusive Education Strategy through your language and interactions with students and parents.

& What evidence of respectful peer relationships are you seeing in your classroom?

& How have you provided your students with classroom materials and activities that honour their diversity, values, backgrounds, and experiences?

& What strategies have you employed to reach out, communicate and work effectively with your diverse range of parents?

& What steps have you taken to identify and, if needed, modify your personal beliefs and biases that were inconsistent with equity and inclusive education principles?

& Tell me about the aspects of your classroom learning environment that reflect and promote diversity as a strength.

& What examples can you share with me of instances when you have used “teachable moments” to address non-inclusive, disrespectful, or discriminatory classroom behaviours?

& How have you worked with your students to develop a process through which concerns and issues about discrimination can be identified, discussed and resolved?

& What strategies have you used to encourage student leadership by involving your students in establishing and monitoring inclusive education practices to embed equity in your classroom?

& How can I help you to be more knowledgeable and effective in embedding the principles of equity and inclusion in your classroom?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy, K-6:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Literacy, K-6” should include the following core content:

 

·   Using a range of appropriate strategies and tools to assess and monitor learning in order to inform instructional design

·   Selecting and using a broad range of student learning and curriculum aligned resource materials

·   Using gradual release of responsibility to move from explicit teacher modeling to independent application of literacy skills

·   Selecting and using strategies to engage students effectively in purposeful talk

·   Designing a variety of learning opportunities that engage students in developing literacy skills for the 21st

·   Using a broad repertoire of instructional strategies to address the wide variety of learning needs

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy, K-6:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& How have you scheduled teaching/learning time so that students have uninterrupted blocks of learning time in literacy?

& What strategies do you use to assess the range of understanding and prior knowledge in your classroom?

& Which instructional strategies are you implementing in your classroom to meet a variety of student needs?

& What have you noticed about student responses to the instructional choices you make?

& Tell me about how you are involving students in monitoring their own learning?

& How do you know the instructional choices are making a difference for all students?

& How do you use the classroom walls to support teaching and learning?

& How do the resources you use support and reflect ethno and cultural diversity within your classroom?

& What kind of support or new learning do you feel you need next in order to work even more effectively with the students in your classroom?

& What resources will you use as you work on expanding your instructional repertoire?

& To whom do you turn when you have a question about instruction, assessment and/or resources?

& Talk to me about the components of a comprehensive literacy program in your classroom …

& Are there specific strategies that you are using to engage boys/ all students in reading and writing?

& How can I help you be even more effective?

& ?

 

 

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy, 7-12:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Literacy, 7-12” should include the following core content:

 

·   Selecting and using effective pre-, during- and post-oral language strategies to engage students in purposeful speaking and listening and to develop higher-level thinking skills across curriculum areas

·   Selecting and using appropriate pre-, during- and post-reading instructional strategies to engage students in meaning-making from a variety of texts and to develop higher-level thinking skills across curriculum areas

·   Selecting and using appropriate pre-, during- and post-writing instructional strategies to engage students in creating texts to communicate meaning and to develop higher-level thinking skills across curriculum areas

·   Using explicit teaching and modeling of oral, reading and writing strategies, providing feedback on student practice, and assessing independent application of literacy strategies across the curriculum

·   Modeling metacognitive strategies to develop students’ understanding of their own thinking

·   Selecting and using a range of student learning and curriculum-aligned resource materials

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literacy, 7-12:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& Which oral, reading and writing instructional strategies are you implementing in your classroom to meet a variety of student needs?

& What have you noticed about student responses to the instructional choices you make?

& How do you know the instructional choices are making a difference for all students?

& How do you know your students are enjoying reading, writing and communicating in your classroom?

& Describe an example of a time when you included the explicit teaching of oral, reading and writing strategies in your lessons. What was most successful about this lesson? What would you change next time?

& Do you hear your students engaged in meaningful talk during lessons?  Let’s talk about it…

& Tell me about the strategies you are using to develop students’ metacognitive skills . . .  which, do you feel, have been most successful?

& What different types of text (such as print, oral, visual, graphical, electronic) are you using to support learning in your classroom?

& How do the resources and strategies you use support the needs and reflect the interests of all students? (such as male and female students, non-university bound students and non-traditional occupations, ethno and cultural diversity)

& How do you use the classroom walls to support teaching and learning?

& What kind of support or new learning do you feel you need next in order to work even more effectively in developing the literacy skills of the students in your classroom?

& What strategies/resources will you use as you work on expanding your instructional repertoire?

& To whom do you turn when you have a question about literacy instruction, assessment and/or resources?

& How can I help you be even more effective?

& ?

 

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mathematical Literacy/Numeracy, 7-12:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Mathematical Literacy/Numeracy, 7-12” should include the following core content:

 

·   Professional learning opportunities that develop and strengthen mathematical literacy, as well as competence in both mathematics content and the methodology for teaching it

·   Strategies to create an appreciation of and a positive disposition towards mathematics, as well as a positive classroom climate

·   Knowledge of effective strategies and resources and of how to use effectively the manipulatives and technologies needed to teach/learn numeracy skills, including differentiating instruction and connections to the everyday applications of numeracy skills

·   How to use diversified means of assessing numeracy skills

·   How to create, access and use appropriate resources, including a variety of print, electronic and media resources (in order to align instruction with the curriculum policy and focus on the important mathematics)

·   How to plan and pose effective questions, and respond to student responses in ways that encourage risk-taking, legitimize errors as part of the learning process, and respect the contributions of all students

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mathematical Literacy/Numeracy, 7-12:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& What are some examples that show your classroom is an active place where I can hear, see and touch mathematics?

& Talk to me about the variety of instructional and assessment tools and strategies you try to use…

& How do you use the data and information provided through your assessment tools and strategies to inform teaching and improve student learning?

& Talk to me about the variety of student needs in your classroom and how you use student groupings to meet some of these needs…

& Which instructional strategies are you implementing in your classroom to meet a variety of student needs?

& What have you noticed about student responses to the instructional choices you make?

& How do you know your instructional choices are making a difference for all students?

& Talk to me about how you base your math instruction on problem construction and solutions…on concrete examples that relate to your students’ everyday activities…

& How do you encourage your students to become engaged in mathematics and to learn co-operative and self-management skills?

& How do you plan lessons that appeal to auditory, kinaesthetic, and visual learners, thereby, having a positive impact on classroom management?

& How/where do you store/manage manipulatives and technologies for ready access?

& How do you plan the questions you will ask in class?

& What are some of the ways you work with students’ responses to encourage risk-taking and to model learning from mistakes?

& How do the resources you use support ethno and cultural diversity within your classroom?

& What kind of support or new learning do you feel you need next in order to work even more effectively with the students in your classroom?

& What strategies/resources will you use as you work on expanding your instructional repertoire?

& To whom do you turn when you have a question about instruction/assessment/resources?

& How can I help you be even more effective?

& ?

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy, K-6:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Numeracy, K-6” should include the following core content:

 

·   Selecting and using a broad range of student learning and curriculum-aligned resource materials

·   Using gradual release of responsibility to move from explicit teacher modeling to independent application of literacy skills

·   Selecting and using strategies to engage students effectively in purposeful talk

·   Using teaching through problem-solving as the foundation for instruction in mathematics

·   Using a broad repertoire of instructional strategies to address the wide variety of learning needs

 

 

Abo

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numeracy, K-6:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

& How have you scheduled teaching/learning time so that students have uninterrupted blocks of numeracy learning time?

& What strategies do you use to assess the range of understanding and prior knowledge in your classroom?

& Which instructional strategies are you implementing in your classroom to meet a variety of student needs?

& What have you noticed about student responses to the instructional choices you make?

& How do you know the instructional choices are making a difference for all students?

& How do you use the classroom walls to support teaching and learning?

& How do the resources you use support and reflect ethno and cultural diversity within your classroom?

& What kind of support or new learning do you feel you need next in order to work even more effectively with the students in your classroom?

& What resources will you use as you work on expanding your instructional repertoire?

& To whom do you turn when you have a question about instruction, assessment and/or resources?

& Talk to me about how you base your math instruction on problem-solving ….

& How can I help you be even more effective?

& ?

 

 

 

 

 

Using Conversation Starters

 

These conversation starters have been developed to support you, as a principal, in your role as a catalyst for professional growth. This material is optional and you are invited to use only the portions that are specific to your needs and the needs of your new teachers as you work with them in your school. This is not intended as a checklist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Schools and Healthy Schools:

Professional Development and Training

 

In the context of what a school board is already offering and specific to the needs of new teachers, professional development and training on “Safe Schools and Healthy Schools” should include the following core content:

 

·   Effective practices aimed at establishing a safe and healthy learning environment and creating positive peer dynamics and relationships that reflect a variety of lifestyles, support ethno and cultural diversity, and promote mutual respect in the classroom

·   Awareness of resources available to support a safe and healthy learning environment, including the school code of conduct as well as the Foundations for a Healthy School framework

·   Knowledge of teaching/learning strategies that promote a safe, healthy and inclusive environment

·   Knowledge of the expectations and requirements related to safe and healthy schools legislation, policies and programs aimed at maintaining a safe and healthy learning environment (e.g. types and nature of incidents that need to be reported along with the appropriate channels through which these reports and observations should be made, understanding of how to use an epi-pen)

 

 

 

About Core Content

 

§  Most school boards already offer professional learning opportunities and supports to all their teachers in order to ensure quality teaching and improved student achievement. 

§  Effective professional learning must be manageable, relevant, timely and appropriate to the daily responsibilities of new teachers.

§  The above core content has been developed in an effort to support new teachers as they progress along a continuum of professional learning through their first year in the profession. As with all areas of learning, proficiency will develop over time.

§  The core content is not to be viewed as a checklist of activities to undertake or an assessment tool to gauge the teacher’s performance.

§  It is intended as a guide for school boards as they design professional learning opportunities for new teachers.  It will help school boards review what they are already offering in order to align it with provincial requirements and ensure a level of consistency in the professional learning opportunities they are offering their new teachers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safe Schools and Healthy Schools:

Conversation Starters between a Principal and a New Teacher

 

In learning-focused conversations with a new teacher, a principal may choose to ask selected questions from the following list:

 

 

SAFE SCHOOLS

& Talk to me about the peer dynamics in your classroom …

& What sorts of strategies did you use to establish rules and routines in your classroom that are consistent with the school’s Code of Conduct?

& What strategies are you using to create a positive learning environment?

& What strategies do you use to address potential problems in a proactive manner?

& What inappropriate or disrespectful behaviour have you successfully dealt with in your classroom? in the school? on the school ground? at school events?

& Have you had challenges with your obligation to report serious student incidents to me?

& Tell me about how the resources you use support and promote respect for ethno-cultural and lifestyle diversity within your classroom …

& In what ways are pro-social skills integrated into your program?

& How familiar are you with the school’s bullying policy and the procedures to report and address bullying incidents? Is there anything that you would like to discuss?

& What situations and behaviours do you find most challenging to resolve? What additional supports would make it easier?

& Tell me about the types of resources you would like to see to support your interaction with a student who is bullied, a student who bullies, or those affected by bullying and the bystanders …

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